Read: February 2018

UncommonType

Uncommon Type: Some Stories by Tom Hanks

My goodness, Tom Hanks, just when I thought you couldn’t be more likable, you’ve done it again.

This debut of 17 short stories from America’s favorite actor (at least mine) are filled with hope but tinged with melancholy and all include a mention or plot incorporation of typewriters, Hanks’ passionate hobby. One particular favorite that lingers in my mind is “The Past is Important to Us.”

I began reading this via a digital ARC from NetGalley prior to its release in the Fall, and even though they were quite enjoyable, I stalled out after reading only a handful. However, after discovering Mr. Hanks narrates the audiobook himself, I was sold on finishing this via audio CDs from the public library, which was time very well spent.

Read via: NetGalley & public library audio book

Ghosts

Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier

The gals from The Ardent Biblio mentioned Raina Telgemier in an October graphic novels post. I’ve overseen purchasing several of her books during our semi-annual Scholastic Book Fair, including Ghosts, but had never read one until I hit a bit of a reading slump mid-month.

This sweet story of two sisters, the very scary reality of a sick sibling, moving to a new community, and (of course) ghosts was a heartwarming look at fierce love and embracing an unknown future. With the plot incorporation of Día de los Muertos, a great movie tie-in would be Disney Pixar’s Coco.

Read via: youth collection from my academic library

HP-Azkaban
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling, illlustrated by Jim Kay

Photo via my Instagram.

Even though The Optometrist and I began reading this aloud together last fall, over the past few weeks we ratcheted up our efforts to finish Prisoner of Azkaban. This has always been my favorite Harry Potter book and Jim Kay’s illustrations just enhanced the tension, excitement, and pleasure Harry finally receives after so long.

If you’ve curious about Jim Kay’s home studio, this video is wonderfully magical, and here he specifically talks about Dementors, Buckbeak, and Snape drawn in The Prisoner of Azkaban.

Book read via: home library

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The Geography of Genius by Eric Weiner

Near the end of 2017 I was approached by friends to be a part of a small book club, and I was the only one who offered a suggestion from my TBR – this one!

When visiting Italy in college I was awed in understanding how when Michelangelo was painting the Sistine Chapel, Raphael was next door painting The School of Athens. This started me thinking about other phenomena of when groups of geniuses arose to change the world.

Not only is the Italian Renaissance featured, but so are genius collectives in ancient Athens and Hangzhou, China, but Edinburgh, Calcutta, Vienna, and Silicon Valley.

For those interested in read-alikes, two that came to mind are: The Know-It-All by A.J. Jacobs and How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World by Steven Johnson, read in October 2016.

Side note: as much as I learned from this book, the pressure of choosing a book, hosting the book club, and feeling responsible for leading the discussion put a damper in the joy out of this reading experience, unfortunately.

Read via: home library

LovePoems

Love Poems by Nikki Giovanni

Mentioned in Dear Fahrenheit 451, I had previously not heard of the poet Nikki Giovanni, but this was the perfect collection to accompany me throughout month, especially with Valentine’s Day in the mix. My personal favorites were “Love Is” and “A Happy Reason.”

Read via: academic library

AliceNetwork

The Alice Network by Kay Quinn

On my radar since this summer from the Modern Mrs. Darcy Summer Reading Guide under the History+ category, I enjoyed the interconnected stories of Eve, a British spy from WWI, and Charlie, a young American woman, on a dual mission to seek answers about their pasts in post-WWII France.

Read via: public library Overdrive

TwoAcross

Two Across by Jeff Bartsch

This was another book brought to my attention by Dear Fahrenheit 451. The Optometrist and I often work crosswords together (one of the things saving my life right now), so this  smart, quirky, unique love story made me feel all.the.feels. Spelling bees, crossword puzzles, youthful mistakes, genuine but confused love, forgiveness, maturity, and redemption elevates this to my favorite book of 2018 so far!

Read via: academic library InterLibrary Loan

LongWayDown

Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds

A highlight of the month was watching the live stream of this year’s ALA Youth Media Awards on February 12th, when the best-of-the-best children’s and young adult books were announced. As the librarian for our university’s youth collection (the favorite part of my job), and a lover of children’s and young adult literature, I soaked up the opportunity to witness authors and illustrators achieve well-deserved prestige and notoriety.

Evidenced by the cover (above), Long Way Down was selected as a Newbery Honor book, an Odyssey (audio) Honor book, a Printz Honor book, and a Coretta Scott King author Honor book.

Told in prose, the plot addresses gun violence and is a story that, sadly, could apply to many young people’s lives across our fractured and hurting country. Read over the span of a couple of hours, themes include the lies we believe for our preservation, the choices we have (to break destructive cycles), and the interconnectedness of our lives with others unbeknownst to us.

HelloUniverse

Hello, Universe by Erin Entrada Kelly

Although this was the recipient of the 2017 Newbery Medal, the plot didn’t overwhelm me. What it did well was create diverse characters, with a mission surrounding friendship and kindness, along with bravery, family, acceptance, and standing up for yourself.


What was your favorite book read in February and/or what are you currently reading? I’m currently reading another ALA award-winning book, The 57 Bus by Dashka Slater, and also look forward to taking Chief Inspector Gamache on Spring Break with me in a few weeks.

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Read: November 2017

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Dead End in Norvelt by Jack Gantos

After finishing Anne of Green Gables on Audible, I wanted to try my public library’s Overdrive audio book selection. I downloaded the app, searched for available Newbery winners, and selected this 2012 medal recipient. Easy!

Narrated by the author, this semi-autobiographical story of Jack Gantos’ childhood is a fictitious glimpse of a child’s life in the post WWII 1950s with quirky characters, two parents with differing styles of love and discipline, the care taken to write a quality obituary, a neat (and true) connection to Eleanor Roosevelt.

Book read via: Overdrive audio

TheEncore

The Encore by Charity Tillemann-Dick

Sixteen years ago I was a vocal music education major in my junior of college and after an extended period of having difficulty producing sound, I was placed on vocal rest by my ear, nose, and throat doctor. The diagnosis of a cyst on one of my vocal chords was the culprit, which I combated with vocal rest, consistent hydration, a modified diet, and medication to combat acid reflux. After approximately 3 months, I was able to begin singing again – a praise for which I continue to give thanks to God Almighty.

Thus when I came across Charity Tillemann-Dick’s story of undergoing a double lung transplant as a young opera singer, I immediately empathized with a fellow soprano and was intrigued to read her account of overcoming a much more serious and life-threatening hurdle.

I flew through this memoir over a weekend and found her story approachable, honest, and filled with faith, hope, and the desire to truly live and be thankful for each personal and musical achievement. Even for those who have not studied classical music or medicine, her story is relatable and entirely inspirational.

Her 2010 TED Med speech/performance gives a condensed synopsis of at least part of her story. Watch her TED Talk here.

Book read via: my academic library InterLibrary Loan (ILL)

84CharingCrossRd

84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff

This has been on my TBR list for ages and after receiving it from ILL, I was astonished how slim an epistolary novel this was – only 71 pages! Had the adjustment back to standard time not thrown my internal clock for a loop, I could have easily read the whole thing in a day.

This collection of real letters exchanged over several decades between Hanff, an avid reader and writer in New York City, and the employees of Marks & Co. antiquarian booksellers at 84, Charing Cross Road in London, was as endearing as I hoped this book would be.

Book read via: my academic library InterLibrary Loan (ILL)

DearMrHenshaw

Dear Mr. Henshaw by Beverly Cleary

The recipient of the 1984 Newbery medal, this is an outstanding example of the timelessness of well-written children’s books that includes themes of reading and writing, the difficult impact divorce has on the life of a child, and the longing to be understood, listened to, and loved.

After reading 84, Charing Cross Road and Dear Mr. Henshaw, I started thinking about other epistolary novels I’ve read and enjoyed, which led me to blog about other books in this style of writing. Read this blog post here.

Listen to Ms. Cleary’s Newbery acceptance speech here.

Read more about my Newbery Reading Project here. 

Book read via: youth collection from my academic library

genius-kerouac

You’re a Genius All the Time by Jack Kerouac

Currently the shelf organization of our main collection allows me to walk out of my office and see this immediately outside my door. I’ve often walked by it, meaning to pick it up for a quick read, and I finally did so on a recent Friday afternoon.

This slim volume contains brief but deep phrases and ideas about the process writing from one of America’s most famous beat poets. My favorite was, “No fear or shame in the dignity of your experience, language & knowledge”

Book read via: my academic library

camino

Camino Island by John Grisham

I read The Innocent Man by John Grisham in April of 2016, but prior to that, Skipping Christmas in 2002 was been the last time I read anything by him newly published. (The Firm remains my favorite of Grisham’s writing.)

I’ve been aware of his more recent publications, but when I heard this book’s premise of a heist planned to steal original F. Scott Fitzgerald manuscripts from Princeton (academic library!), a black market book seller (book store!) and an inquisitive writer (author!) seeking inspiration in Camino Island, Florida, I couldn’t help but request it from the library!

This was a fun read and reminded me why John Grisham (and other authors like him) are so popular – they draw readers in with an intriguing story, likable characters, short and easily digestible chapters, and a tidy conclusion at the end.

Book read via: public library

InThisMoment

In This Moment by Karen Kingsbury

While this is listed as a part of the Baxter family saga, the Baxters and Flanigans are only supporting characters in this newest release from Karen Kingsbury.

The key story revolves around a new character, a Christian high school principal whose students are exhibiting increasingly troubling and dangerous behavior. As a way of providing an alternative, he forms an after school Bible club which results in lives changed…but also a religious freedom lawsuit. Thus themes of standing up for religious liberty are heavily woven throughout Kingsbury’s latest installment.

My thanks to NetGalley for access to the digital ARC. https://www.netgalley.com/

 

Refugee

Refugee by Alan Gratz

A highlight of my fall semester is helping out at our Scholastic Book Fair fundraiser, where a portion of the proceeds go to enhance and support our academic library’s youth collection. When I saw Refugee was included, of which I had heard good reviews, it piqued my interest into a very timely topic and I bought a copy for myself.

Told from three children’s perspectives, each of whom face exile from their homeland: Josef – a boy who is Jewish during Hitler’s oppressive rise in 1930s Germany, Isabel – a girl from Cuba fleeing during Castro’s reign in the 1990s, and Mahmoud – a boy from Syria facing modern-day atrocities.

This would spur wonderful conversation for middle and high school readers, yet due to the intense nature of these three stories, I wouldn’t recommend this for sensitive or younger readers without guidance or an adult reading partner.

Book read via: personal library


I’ve just received several festive Christmas novellas from various library sources and am looking forward to these enhancing my already festive Christmas mood! (Look for a blog post about that soon.) Are you also getting ready to read seasonally? Feel free to leave comments and suggestions below.

 

5 Favorite Epistolary Novels

As the weekend dawns, let’s take a look at five of my favorite epistolary novels. Happy reading weekend, bookish friends!

dracula_book_cover

Dracula by Bram Stoker

During the last semester of my Masters in Library Science program I was enrolled in a reader’s advisory class in which we read a lot of books in various genres, one of which had to be a horror novel.

More recently I’ve discovered I am a highly sensitive person, thus am hesitant about scary premises, but even in 2010 I opted for a classic approach to this assignment. Upon picking up Dracula, I wasn’t expecting this Gothic classic to be told in a series of letters! It was creepy, mysterious, and compelling, but didn’t give me bad dreams at night!

Published in 1897, this novel is now in the public domain and the above link is a free electronic version via Project Gutenberg. Print copies are still easily available too, if you prefer a more tactile reading experience.

guernsey_bookcover

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows 

While it’s been a number of years since reading this sweet series of correspondence between a woman living in London and a small community on a French island, I think fondly think of the enjoyment I received in reading this story set during World War II.

EMP

Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn

I received this as a gift from The Optometrist for Christmas last year and chose to read it a bit later, in July. Centered around the phrase “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog,” the story grows progressively more interesting as letters of the alphabet are banned from being used in written or verbal speech. Read it and you’ll learn why!

84CharingCrossRd

84, Charing Cross Road  by Helene Hanff

I forget how I heard about this epistolary novel, but it was on my ever-growing “wish list” (I would like to read it without buying it). Having reached a slight lull in my reading decisions, I freely requested it through my academic library’s InterLibrary Loan department.

This slim novella could easily be read in a day, or leisurely over a weekend, and was a lighthearted but heartfelt series of real letters between Helene Hanff and the employees of Marks & Co. booksellers found at 84, Charing Cross Road in London.

This little gem was also the catalyst for this blog post!

DearMrHenshaw

Dear Mr. Henshaw by Beverly Cleary

I remember reading this as a little girl while visiting my grandparents, but retained nothing about the plot 25+ years later. The story centers around Leigh Botts, a little boy who writes many letters to his favorite author, Mr. Henshaw, and thus grows as an author himself. It goes without saying that Beverly Cleary knew a thing or two about this topic, having received countless letters from young readers throughout her lifetime.

Upon re-familiarizing myself with this as a part of my Newbery Reading Project, and an example of an epistolary children’s book, I was reminded how well-written children’s books can endure across generations of readers. Even though children are obviously well acquainted with technology and are now more likely to e-mail an author, the themes of inspiration, imagination, dedication to reading and writing, children whose parents are divorced, a longing for friendship, love, and a desire to be known are all timeless.

A surprise came in remembering Paul O. Zelinsky illustrated this book. I loved the episode of Reading Rainbow when Zelinsky’s Caldecott winning version of Rumpelstiltskin is included! Watch the full Reading Rainbow on YouTube episode here.


Are there other epistolary novels you’ve enjoyed and would recommend? Please feel free to share in the comments below!

Read: October 2017

Jane

Jane, Unlimited by Kristin Cashore

This new release from the author of Graceling was one I had been anticipating for the fall, but it did not live up to the fondness I had in reading her debut novel many years ago.

The basic premise is that Jane, a young woman mourning over the death of her explorer aunt, fulfills a promise made to her aunt and accepts an invitation to a gala at Tu Reviens, a castle on a secluded island owned by a wealthy friend’s family. I enjoyed the first 2/3 of the book as Jane gets to know the other gala guests and residents of the house and begins to suspect things aren’t as they seem.

But then, the plot intentionally starts to shift and Jane is able to choose her own adventure. Once this happens, as a reader, I found it hard to remember details of plot lines, especially before things shift at the start of the next chapter. I would have also liked a bit more connection between these scenarios and an overall sense of closure at the end of the book, which didn’t happen.

My thanks to NetGalley for access to the digital ARC. https://www.netgalley.com/ 

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Artemis by Andy Weir

Andy Weir’s sophomore release with a female lead character (huzzah!), set on the moon, is available November 14. Look for my book review in just a couple of weeks!

My thanks to NetGalley for access to the digital ARC. https://www.netgalley.com/ 

WednesdayWars

The Wednesday Wars by Gary D. Schmidt

My original inspiration to read this came from Everyday Reading at Janssen’s high recommendation. Then I read about Madeleine’s Newbery project on Top Shelf Text, so I have revisited my goal of diligently reading more Newbery award-winners and am excited about this project!

Set in the late 1960s during the Vietnam War, 7th grader Holling Hoodhood is convinced his teacher hates him. As the school year progresses, he begins to better understand himself, his teacher, his believably quirky family members, the impact of war in his school and community, along with an unexpected appreciation for Shakespeare.

A great, more contemporary partner book would be Summerlost by Ally Condie.

This is a terrific coming-of-age middle grade novel, very deserving of its Newbery honor.

Book read via: public library

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The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman

Coraline was my first Gaiman book and The Ocean at the End of the Lane was one I thoroughly enjoyed a few years ago. I would also say I’ve read about 30% of American Gods and would still like to finish it, maybe as an audio book.

Knowing Gaiman is a masterfully spooky storyteller, I was a bit hesitant to read this 2009 Newbery-award winner. While there definitely were some moments I felt nervous for how things were going to turn out for protagonist Nobody “Bod” Owens, and while steeped with murder and death, there were many moments filled with gentleness, kindness, and caring.

While reading, I felt like these were a continuation of stories with some chapters containing a mini-adventure as Bod grows and learns about the dead and the living. In the post script, Gaiman shares how portions of the book were pieced together over time (the sensation I experienced), but there is still great continuity in the writing and execution of this middle grade novel, perfect for Halloween.

Book read via: youth collection from my academic library
HateUGive

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

I first heard about this YA debut via the Modern Mrs. Darcy Summer Reading Guide in the Thought-Provoking Stories category. Since then I have heard it mentioned many times as a tour de force centered around the topic of police brutality in an African American community.

In my quest to read more diverse books as of late, this has probably stretched me the most as I’ve begun to better understand the injustices many African Americans face in low-income areas. Although this is a work of fiction, the killing of innocent young people and the cyclical reality of drugs and gangs in so many neighborhoods was brutally honest and eye-opening.

Book read via: public library

Anne

Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery

I have owned a paperback copy of Anne of Green Gables for probably two decades and have meant, year after year, to read this childhood classic. I also have a framed Litograph of the text of Anne in my library office. Yet, when I discovered Rachel McAdams’ narration, I bought the corresponding e-book just to take advantage of the Audible deal. After finishing Echo last month, I was ready to dive into another great audio book and this one did not disappoint!

Now I can say I finally understand the hype for Anne (my husband was astonished I had never read this beloved series, while he was very familiar with the miniseries) and, as Anne would say, I would now consider her a “kindred spirit.” I have absolutely fallen in love with this smart and spunky heroine and her fantastic “scope of imagination.”

Thankfully my public library has other audio books in the Anne series available via Overdrive, so I’m excited I can continue to listen to Anne’s subsequent adventures.

Book read via: Audible

bury-your-dead

Bury Your Dead by Louise Penny

Looking back on previous blog posts, about every couple of months I pick up the next installment of the Chief Inspector Gamache series, with this being the 6th. I love how Penny often sets her stores in real places, with this story centering around the Winter Carnival in Québec City. To help give my imagination a boost, I often performed image searches online to see what locations like the Literary and Historical Society (Lit and His) and the Château Frontenac look like in real life.

I was also able to learn a little Canadian history, particularly about Samuel de Champlain, the founder of Québec City and the historical figure around whom this mystery centers.

When a prominent Champlain scholar is found dead while the Chief Inspector is visiting Québec, grieving the loss of one of his recently deceased agents, he can’t help but get involved to catch the murderer. All the while the Chief Inspector has tasked his 2nd in command, Agent Beauvior, to oversee a secret investigation in Three Pines; re-interviewing and re-examining evidence from the previous book in the series The Brutal Telling.

There were so many intriguing plot lines and cozy settings, I didn’t want to see this one end!

Book read via: public library


Fall is the perfect time for cozy reading, so please share what you’re enjoying or anticipating reading during this season!

Newbery Reading Project

newbery-medal“The Newbery Medal was named for eighteenth-century British bookseller John Newbery. It is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association, to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.” (American Library Association)

I am endeavoring to read Newbery medal winners and honor books from at least 1981 (my birth year) to the present. Some of these I read as a child, but I’m classifying “recently” as beginning in 2008, the year I began my Masters in Library Science. Stay tuned for semi-regular updates and feel free to begin your own Newbery reading project!

2018

  • Hello, Universe by Erin Entrada Kelly (2018)
  • Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut by Derrick Barnes (2018)
  • Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds (2018)
  • Piecing Me Together by Renée Watson

2017

  • The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill 
  • Freedom Over Me: Eleven Slaves, Their Lives and Dreams Brought to Life by Ashley Bryan
  • The Inquisitor’s Tale: Or, the Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog by Adam Gidwitz
  • Wolf Hollow by Lauren Wolk

2016

  • Last Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Peña (2016)
  • The War that Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley
  • Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson
  • Echo by Pam Muñoz Ryan (2017)

2015

  • The Crossover by Kwame Alexander (2017)
  • El Deafo by Cece Bell (2016)
  • Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson (2016)

2014

  • Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures by Kate DiCamillo (2014)
  • Doll Bones by Holly Black
  • The Year of Billy Miller by Kevin Henkes
  • One Came Home by Amy Timberlake
  • Paperboy by Vince Vawter

2013

  • The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate (2014)
  • Splendors and Glooms by Laura Amy Schlitz
  • Bomb: The Race to Build — and Steal — the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon by Steve Sheinkin
  • Three Times Lucky by Sheila Turnage

2012

  • Dead End in Norvelt by Jack Gantos (2017)
  • Inside Out & Back Again by Thanhha Lai
  • Breaking Stalin’s Nose by Eugene Yelchin

2011

  • Moon over Manifest by Clare Vanderpool
  • Turtle in Paradise by Jennifer L. Holm
  • Heart of a Samurai by Margi Preus
  • Dark Emperor and Other Poems of the Night by Joyce Sidman
  • One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia

2010

  • When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead (2015)
  • Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice by Phillip Hoose
  • The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly
  • Where the Mountain Meets the Moon by Grace Lin
  • The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg by Rodman Philbrick

2009

  • The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman (2017)
  • The Underneath by Kathi Appelt
  • The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom by Margarita Engle
  • Savvy by Ingrid Law
  • After Tupac & D Foster by Jacqueline Woodson

2008

  • Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! Voices from a Medieval Village by Laura Amy Schiltz
  • Elijah of Buxton by Christopher Paul Curtis
  • The Wednesday Wars by Gary D. Schmidt (2017)
  • Feathers by Jacqueline Woodson

2007

  • The Higher Power of Lucky by Susan Patron
  • Penny from Heaven by Jennifer L. Holm
  • Hattie Big Sky by Kirby Larson
  • Rules by Cynthia Lord (2009 – signed copy after hearing her speak live)

2006

  • Criss Cross by Lynne Rae Perkins
  • Whittington by Alan Armstrong
  • Hitler Youth: Growing Up in Hitler’s Shadow by Susan Campbell Bartoletti
  • Princess Academy by Shannon Hale
  • Show Way by Jacqueline Woodson

2005

  • Kira-Kira by Cynthia Kadohata
  • Al Capone Does My Shirts by Gennifer Choldenko (2009)
  • The Voice that Challenged a  Nation: Marian Anderson and the Struggle for Equal Rights by Russell Freedman
  • Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy by Gary D. Schmidt

2004

  • The Tale of Despereaux: Being the Story of a Mouse, a Princess, Some Soup, and a Spool of Thread by Kate DiCamillo (read pre-2008)
  • Olive’s Ocean by Kevin Henkes (2009)
  • An American Plague: The True and Terrifying Story of the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793 by Jim Murphy

2003

  • Crispin: The Cross of Lead by Avi
  • The House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer
  • Pictures of Hollis Woods by Patricia Reilly Giff
  • Hoot by Carl Hiaasen
  • A Corner of the Universe by Ann M. Martin
  • Surviving the Applewhites by Stephanie S. Tolan (2008)

2002

  • A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park
  • Everything on a Waffle by Polly Horvath
  • Carver: A Life in Poems by Marilyn Nelson

2001

  • A Year Down Yonder by Richard Peck
  • Hope Was Here by Joan Bauer
  • Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo (2008)
  • Joey Pigza Loses Control by Jack Gantos
  • The Wanderer by Sharon Creech

2000

  • Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis (read pre-2008)
  • Getting Near to Baby by Audrey Couloumbis
  • Our Only May Amelia by Jennifer L. Holm
  • 26 Fairmont Avenue by Tomie dePaola

1999

  • Holes by Louis Sachar
  • A Long Way from Chicago by Richard Peck

1998

  • Out of the Dust by Karen Hesse
  • Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine (2009)
  • Lily’s Crossing by Patricia Reilly Giff
  • Wringer by Jerry Spinelli

1997

  • The View from Saturday by E.L. Konigsburg
  • A Girl Named Disaster by Nancy Farmer
  • Moorchild by Eloise McGraw
  • The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner
  • Belle Prater’s Boy by Ruth White

1996

  • The Midwife’s Apprentice by Karen Cushman
  • What Jamie Saw by Carolyn Coman
  • The Watsons Go to Birmingham: 1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis
  • Yolanda’s Genius by Carol Fenner
  • The Great Fire by Jim Murphy

1995

  • Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech
  • Catherine, Called Birdy by Karen Cushman
  • The Ear, the Eye and the Arm by Nancy Farmer

1994

  • The Giver by Lois Lowry (read pre-2008)
  • Crazy Lady by Jane Leslie Conly
  • Dragon’s Gate by Laurence Yep
  • Eleanor Roosevelt: A Life of Discovery by Russell Freedman

1993

  • Missing May by Cynthia Rylant
  • What Hearts by Bruce Brooks
  • The Dark-thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural by Patricia McKissack
  • Somewhere in the Darkness by Walter Dean Myers

1992

  • Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor (read pre-2008, signed copy)
  • Nothing But The Truth: a Documentary Novel by Avi
  • The Wright Brothers: How They Invented the Airplane by Russell Freedman

1991

  • Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli
  • The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle by Avi (read pre-2008)

1990

  •  Number the Stars by Lois Lowry (read pre-2008)
  • Afternoon of the Elves by Janet Taylor Lisle
  • Shabanu, Daughter of the Wind by Suzanne Fisher Staples
  • The Winter Room by Gary Paulsen

1989

  • Joyful Noise: Poems for Two Voices by Paul Fleischman
  • In The Beginning: Creation Stories from Around the World by Virginia Hamilton (Harcourt)
  • Scorpions by Walter Dean Myers

1988

  • Lincoln: A Photobiography by Russell Freedman
  • After The Rain by Norma Fox Mazer
  • Hatchet by Gary Paulsen

1987

  • The Whipping Boy by Sid Fleischman
  • A Fine White Dust by Cynthia Rylant
  • On My Honor by Marion Dane Bauer
  • Volcano: The Eruption and Healing of Mount St. Helens by Patricia Lauber

1986

  • Sarah, Plain and Tall by Patricia MacLachlan (read pre-2008)
  • Commodore Perry In the Land of the Shogun by Rhoda Blumberg
  • Dogsong by Gary Paulsen

1985

  • The Hero and the Crown by Robin McKinley
  • Like Jake and Me by Mavis Jukes
  • The Moves Make the Man by Bruce Brooks
  • One-Eyed Cat by Paula Fox

1984

  • Dear Mr. Henshaw by Beverly Cleary (2017)
  • The Sign of the Beaver by Elizabeth George Speare
  • A Solitary Blue by Cynthia Voigt
  • Sugaring Time by Kathryn Lasky
  • The Wish Giver: Three Tales of Coven Tree by Bill Brittain

1983

  • Dicey’s Song by Cynthia Voigt
  • The Blue Sword by Robin McKinley
  • Doctor DeSoto by William Steig
  • Graven Images by Paul Fleischman
  • Homesick: My Own Story by Jean Fritz
  • Sweet Whispers, Brother Rush by Virginia Hamilton

1982

  • A Visit to William Blake’s Inn: Poems for Innocent and Experienced Travelers by Nancy Willard
  • Ramona Quimby, Age 8 by Beverly Cleary
  • Upon the Head of the Goat: A Childhood in Hungary 1939-1944 by Aranka Siegal

1981

  • Jacob Have I Loved by Katherine Paterson (read pre-2008)
  • The Fledgling by Jane Langton
  • A Ring of Endless Light by Madeleine L’Engle

~~~~

1959

  • The Family Under the Bridge by Natalie Savage Carlson (2017)

 

Read: September 2017

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The Almost Sisters by Joshilyn Jackson

For a long time I’ve been wanting to read something I enjoyed as much as The Help by Kathyrn Stockett. I finally realized I had enjoyed what is categorized as “southern fiction” and The Almost Sisters completely met this literary longing. I’m now interested in reading Ms. Jackson’s other works of fiction and am excited to have found a sub-genre that is comforting to me.

Featured in the Modern Mrs. Darcy Summer Reading Guide, from the Families are Complicated section, the premise sounded a bit scandalous, but when Anne Bogel described this as “The Help meets Comic Con,” I was intrigued and am glad I took a chance in reading this!

A theme that resonated with me was the “second south,” where protagonist Leia has grown up with sweet tea, hospitality, and a love for Jesus as the “first south,” but as she has grown older she recognizes hatred, close-mindedness, and bigotry still simmer beneath the surface as the “second south.”

This has reminded me that I often read within my comfort zone and haven’t consciously explored diversity as much as I should. Therefore, I’m compelled to now read Dreamland Burning by Jennifer Latham, and The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas.

Book read via: public library

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March. Book Two by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, & Nate Powell

While The Almost Sisters is contemporary fiction, the theme of segregation in the Deep South dovetailed into my choice to read the second non-fiction, graphic novel installment about the Civil Rights movement by Representative John Lewis. Book Two picks up where Book One ended, which I read in January.

Book read via: youth collection from my academic library

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Echo by Pam Munoz Ryan

As I’ve said before, I believe the right book finds you at the right time, and I love how my “random” choices in books have all had intersecting themes of looking beyond cultural and race differences.

When Sarah Mackenzie of Read Aloud Revival recommend this via Audible, I was intrigued by her praise, so I bought it and it did not disappoint! This book was not simply narrated, it was performed by several talented voice actors and the narrated story was enhanced by gifted musicians.

Themes of intolerance, kindness, war, hope, and the transforming power of music are threaded throughout three intersecting plots and is one of the best children’s books I’ve ever read (and I’ve read a lot, let me tell you). Right now this has climbed to the top of my favorites read in 2017, thus I HIGHLY recommend this middle-grade story to readers of all ages!

Book read via: Audible

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March. Book Three by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, & Nate Powell

In light of this month’s reading theme, I was excited to see March. Book Three come into my office on a truck of new books shortly after reading Book Two. Representative Lewis’ Book Three is the grittiest and most difficult to read of this trilogy, especially his first-hand accounts of “Bloody Sunday” – the Civil Rights attempt to march from Selma to Montgomery, AL, for equal voting rights.

In my opinion, this series is suited to older readers who can best put Civil Rights into context and comprehend tragedies in our nation’s history. Incorporating these into a classroom discussion would be timely considering current headlines: take a knee, police brutality, immigration, DACA, etc.

Book read via: youth collection from my academic library

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The Mothers by Brit Bennett

Midway through the month I saw this on the New Books shelf in my local public library and was intrigued with the premise: loss, longing, and a secret with lasting consequences. Even though this has been listed on “read diverse books” lists, I felt like these themes and characters could have been of any race, from any location.

Book read via: public library


What have you read in September? Care to share any good recommendations?

My books on the nightstand that will likely be finished in October are Artemis by Andy Weir (releasing November 14) and Jane Unlimited by Kristin Cashore, plus hopefully a few more!

Saving My Life: Beginning of Fall Edition

As per the phrase by Barbara Brown Taylor, this is a look at the things saving my life as fall begins.

  1. Bath & Body Works Spiced Apple Bourbon hand soap with pumpkin butter

    During my last trip to Bath & Body Works, I discovered they didn’t have the Leaves scent in this year’s fall soaps, which is my all time favorite. I was so disappointed I didn’t take the time to try anything else new this season, but when a dear friend gave us this as a thank-you gift, I was excited to realize it is very reminiscent of Leaves. Washing my hands at the kitchen sink has been an extra special treat, thanks to this year’s new release!

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  2. Cross stitch

    Since mid-August I’ve been experiencing some consistent joint stiffness and occasional twinges of pain in my left pinkie finger. When you look at the sheer number of items I knit in July, it’s no wonder my joints and hands have needed a break! And while I know it’s in my body’s best interest to give my hands time to rest, it’s been so difficult to not reach for my needles and yarn (or sit down at my piano) during this stressful back-to-school time. But I’ve had to go through seasons of vocal rest in the past and have seen God bring about healing in His time, so I am making a concerted effort to trust His faithfulness once more.

    With this in mind, my patient mother-in-law recently gave me a refresher tutorial on how to cross-stitch. As a young girl I loved printed cross-stitch, but was always intimidated by counted cross-stitch. A few years ago I picked up this beginning kit from Cecilia’s Samplers in Branson, MO, determined to learn, so she showed me a few things, but after our visit I promptly went back to knitting. Now that I’m on the knitting DL, I figured this was the perfect time to devote my creative energies to a new craft, while not putting as much strain on my fingers. It’s been a fun, puzzle-like adventure to see take shape, X by X.

    This is “Simplicity” by Little House Needleworks.

  3. Adult coloring books

    As a child I wasn’t a huge fan of coloring. I loved activity books with word searches and dot-to-dot pictures, but the lack of precision of crayons was always frustrating to my small hands. Fast forward about 30 years and now that adult coloring books and colored pencils have arrived on the scene, this has been another way for me to decompress at the end of a long day. This is Enchanted Forest by Johanna Basford, a past Christmas present from The Optometrist.

  4. Echo by Pam Munoz Ryan on Audible

    While coloring, I have frequently set my phone nearby and listened to this spectacularly performed (not just narrated) middle-grade story that spans continents and time frames, all connected to themes of hope and the power of music.

    It was highly reviewed by Sarah Mackenzie of Read Aloud Revival and it has lived up to her recommendation! Not only so, but it’s one of the best children’s books I’ve ever read and so far my favorite overall book of 2017.

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  5. NCIS 

    And when my brain has needed a vacation, it has often found itself escaping via Netflix to NCIS headquarters to hang out with Gibbs, Ziva, McGee, Abby, and company. The Optometrist and I are currently working our way through Season 10 and I realized the other day, the reason I watch isn’t for the mystery or murders they solve, it’s for the character development between cast members. (I consider them make-believe friends.)NCIS


What things are saving your life as fall finally arrives?